Dr. Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) receives the 2022 Elliott P. Skinner Book Award

The Association for Africanist Anthropology has awarded Dr. Isabella Alexander the 2022 Elliott P. Skinner Book Award for her book Burning at Europe’s Borders.

This prize is awarded to the book that “best furthers both the global community of Africanist scholars and the wider interests of the African continent, with special consideration given to works drawing upon extensive research in Africa and advancing new methodologies for anthropological fieldwork in Africa.”

Chikako Ozawa-de Silva awarded 2022 Francis L.K. Hsu Book Prize for her monograph: The Anatomy of Loneliness: Suicide, Social Connection, and the Search for Relational Meaning in Contemporary Japan

The Society for East Asian Anthropology recognizes an English-language book published in the previous calendar year that made the most significant contribution to the field with the 2022 Francis L.K. Hsu Book Prize.

The committee found Chikako’s book to be “poignant, richly ethnographic, and an exemplary instance of a book that really speaks beyond our field.”

Alumni Dr. Alexander Hinton is awarded the 2022 Anthropology in Media Award (AIME)


Dr. Alexander Hinton graduated in 1997 and majored in Psychology and Cultural Anthropology. His dissertation was on the Cambodian genocide. Today, he is a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Director of the Center for the Genocide and Human Rights, and UNESCO Chair in Genocide Prevention at Rutgers University, Newark. He is an award-winning author and editor of seventeen books, including most recently, Anthropological Witness: Lessons from the Khmer Rouge Tribunal (Cornell, 2022)—which focuses on his testimony as an expert witness at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal and his exchange with “Brother Number Two.”

The AIME award is reserved for persons who have “raised public awareness of anthropology and have had a broad and sustained public impact at local, national, and international level.” Congratulations Dr. Alexander Hinton!

Read more about the AAA 2022 Award Recipients here!

John Lindo co-authors a publication on the archeological identification of Denisovan ancestry DNA found in South America.

“It’s phenomenal that Denisovan ancestry made it all the way to South America,” says John Lindo, a co-corresponding author of the paper and an anthropologist at Emory who specializes in ancient DNA analysis, “The admixture must have occurred a long time before, perhaps 40,000 years ago.”

Lindo also states the fact that the Denisovan lineage persisted and its genetic signal made it into an ancient individual from Uruguay that is only 1,500 years old suggests that it was a large admixture event between a population of humans and Denisovans.

Read the full article here!

Yulia Chuvileva, PhD Alumna in Anthropology, and co-authors present their report on Selling Industrial Gallina Criolla Products in Guatemala.

“Selling Industrial ‘Gallina Criolla’ Products in Guatemala” details these new
corporate marketing tactics of competing with gallina criolla economies of
indgenous and peasant peoples. The report begins by summarizing the latest
science on the economic, ecological, social, nutritional, and taste differences
between gallina criolla and industrial chicken. It shows that the gallinas criollas
that emerge from campesina systems of production are different animals than
the industrial chickens that emerge from industrial systems of production. The
methods of rearing involved, the ecological and economic functions the birds
perform, and the nutritional value and taste of the chicken meat from the two
systems are not the same. At the same time, while gallina criolla production
is one part of agroecological systems that tend towards diversity, industrial
production of commercial chickens tends towards homogeneity.

Read the full report here.

Lori Jahnke awarded grant for Digital Archives and Indigenous Afterlives of Scientific Objects project.

Lori Jahnke, the Department of Anthropology librarian, and her colleagues at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, University of Iowa, and researchers at Fiocruz will share a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation aimed at responsible management of scientific collections created under unequal power dynamics. Jahnke and her colleagues plan to establish and test a methodology for collaborative, community-based work to document and understand subjects’ experience of scientific research and the afterlives of scientific objects that are produced. The project will help researchers reevaluate assumptions about data collection, their methodologies, intellectual property and knowledge production.

Read more about the research here.

Marcela Benítez is awarded AI.Humanity Seed Grant for AI Forest: Cognition in the Wild proposal.

Marcela Benítez (Emory University, Emory College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Anthropology) and Jacob Abernethy (Georgia Tech, School of Computer Science) were recipients of the AI.Humanity Seed Grant Program. They were awarded $100,000 in funding towards their proposal to develop and implement “smart” testing stations using artificial intelligence (AI) for long-term cognitive assessment and monitoring of wild capuchin monkeys at the Toboga Forest Reserve in Costa Rica.

Anthropology graduate students, SJ Dillon, is awarded NSF GRFP

SJ Dillon has been awarded the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship for their dissertation research into gender dysphoria. They will will provide an ethnographic account of a diverse group of trans communities in contemporary Atlanta, Georgia, and will compare discourses on gender dysphoria in national medical and state-level legal discourses to that ethnographic data.