Emory recognizes Indigenous Peoples’ Day

President Fenves of Emory University recognizes Indigenous Peoples’ Day:

Dear members of the Emory community,

On October 12, we will join communities throughout the nation to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day and honor the resilience, history, traditions, and cultures of Indigenous and Native American peoples. 

Emory’s recognition includes consideration of the first inhabitants of the land that our campus now calls home — a land whose history can be traced to the Muscogee Creek Nation. As the Muscogee Creek community continues to confront systemic racism, and as our university acknowledges its own difficult histories, we believe it is important to honor those faculty, staff, and students who create vibrant spaces of inclusion on our campus for Native and Indigenous voices. Their work is defining a new legacy at Emory — one that empowers those whose talents and gifts were overlooked and marginalized for generations.

We are proud that, for the first time at Emory, we are formally recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day and acknowledging its significance within our community and beyond.

In celebration of this observance, on Monday, October 12, at 4 p.m. (via Zoom) Professor of English Craig Womack (Creek) will chair a panel discussion entitled McGirt v. Oklahoma: Understanding the Implications of the Recent Supreme Court Decision Across Native America, which will explore the impact of the recent landmark decision regarding the Creek Nation for Oklahoma tribal nations and other parts of Indian Country.   

We encourage our community to spend time reflecting on our history and to consider ways to advance human rights and social justice at Emory and in the world. 

Sincerely, 

Gregory L.  Fenves
President 

The Department of Anthropology at Emory University (Atlanta, GA) Invites Applications for two Tenure Track Positions in Cultural Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology at Emory University (Atlanta, GA) invites applications for two tenure track positions in cultural anthropology to begin Fall 2021. We seek scholars at the rank of assistant or associate professor who address contemporary issues of pressing concern. Broadly speaking, our hiring focus will prioritize interest in and theoretical engagement with race, power, difference, and inequality, activist anthropology, ethics and humanitarianism, and social movements.  We are particularly interested in anthropologists who work in one or more of the following areas (listed alphabetically): food insecurity and environment; gender and sexuality; migration, borders, and refugees; and well-being, health, and mental health. 

Candidates should be willing and able to regularly teach general courses in cultural anthropology along with courses in their area of expertise both at undergraduate and graduate levels. They also should be willing to mentor undergraduate and graduate students. Candidates must have a doctoral degree, excellent research record, and a demonstrated commitment to teaching.  

Applications should include cover letter, curriculum vita, research statement, teaching statement, a statement about teaching and mentorship of students of diverse backgrounds, and complete contact information for three references. The Department of Anthropology, Emory College of Arts and Sciences, and Emory University embrace diversity and seek candidates who will participate in a climate that attracts students of all ethnicities, races, nationalities, genders, and members of the LGBTQ+ community. This search is part of an exciting new hiring initiative to diversify faculty across the College of Arts and Sciences with prominent hires in the consonant areas of African American Studies, Sociology, History, Philosophy, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 

Review of applications will begin on November 1, and applications will be accepted through December 1, 2020. To apply for this position, please submit your materials free of charge through Interfolio: http://apply.interfolio.com/79206 

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, non-binary individuals, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply. 

The Department of Anthropology at Emory University (Atlanta, GA) Invites Applications for a Tenured Position in Biological Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology at Emory University (Atlanta, GA) invites applications for a tenured position in biological anthropology to begin Fall 2021. We seek scholars at the associate or full professor level who are engaged in cutting-edge research in any area of biological anthropology. To complement existing departmental strengths, we are particularly interested in scholars engaged in field and/or lab-based research in the areas of behavioral/human ecology, genetics, human biology, paleoanthropology, prehistoric archaeology, primatology, neuroscience and anthropology, and scientifically-based medical anthropology. Candidates should be willing and able to regularly teach a large introductory or foundational course in biological anthropology along with courses in their area of expertise and be willing to mentor undergraduate and graduate students. Candidates must have a doctoral degree, excellent research record, and a demonstrated commitment to teaching.  

Applications should include cover letter, curriculum vita, research statement, teaching statement, a statement about teaching and mentorship of students of diverse backgrounds, and complete contact information for three references. The Department of Anthropology, Emory College of Arts and Science, and Emory University embrace diversity and seek candidates who will participate in a climate that attracts students of all ethnicities, races, nationalities, genders, and members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Review of applications will begin on November 1, and applications will be accepted through December 1, 2020. To apply for this position, please submit your materials free of charge through Interfolio: http://apply.interfolio.com/79198 

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, non-binary individuals, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Dr. Kristin Phillips wins 2020 Society for Economic Anthropology Book Prize

Anthropology faculty member Dr. Kristin Phillips has been named a co-winner of the 2020 Society for Economic Anthropology Book Prize for her 2018 book: An Ethnography of Hunger: Politics, Subsistence, and the Unpredictable Grace of the Sun (Indiana University Press).  The award honors the best book in economic anthropology published during the last three years.  Phillips shares this honor with Dr. Kathleen Millar of the University of British Columbia for her 2018 book: Reclaiming the Discarded: Life and Labor on Rio’s Garbage Dump (Duke University Press). 

Three Outstanding Faculty of the Anthropology Department Retire

Professor Barlett received her PhD from Columbia University in 1975 and joined Emory in 1976, where she became a founding member of the Department of Anthropology.

Professor Shore received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1977 and joined Emory University in 1984 as Associate Professor of Anthropology.

Professor Worthman received her PhD from Harvard University in 1978 and was appointed Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Emory in 1986.

Alumni spotlight: Andrew (Andy) Wooyoung Kim (‘15C), PhD candidate at Northwestern University

Andrew (Andy) Wooyoung Kim (‘15C), PhD candidate in biological anthropology at Northwestern University and an alumnus of Emory Anthropology and Development Studies, recently spoke on South African TV and radio to discuss his current work on the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic among communities and healthcare systems in Johannesburg. Speaking on his ethnographic work that he wrote about in an opinion piece published through the Bhekisisa Centre for Health Journalism, Andy describes the tireless efforts of grassroots mental health organizations on the frontlines of the pandemic and the promise of telepsychiatry as a future mode of service delivery in South Africa.Andrew (Andy) Wooyoung Kim (‘15C), PhD candidate in biological anthropology at Northwestern University and an alumnus of Emory Anthropology and Development Studies, recently spoke on South African TV and radio to discuss his current work on the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic among communities and healthcare systems in Johannesburg. Speaking on his ethnographic work that he wrote about in an opinion piece published through the Bhekisisa Centre for Health Journalism, Andy describes the tireless efforts of grassroots mental health organizations on the frontlines of the pandemic and the promise of telepsychiatry as a future mode of service delivery in South Africa.
Since August 2019, Andy has been conducting his dissertation fieldwork on the intergenerational effects of trauma from apartheid. He collaborates with a 30-year longitudinal birth cohort study called Birth to Twenty (also known as “Mandela’s Children) to understand how traumatic experiences that pregnant women faced during the dissolution of apartheid affect the health and biology of subsequent generations. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic cutting his data collection short, he took advantage of his existing research infrastructure to evaluate the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, identify community psychosocial needs, and connect families to critical social services. He writes about these experiences in a forthcoming special issue on COVID-19 in the American Journal of Human Biology
At Northwestern, Andy is currently being advised by fellow Emory Anthropology alumni Christopher Kuzawa (PhD MSPH 2001) and Thomas McDade (PhD 1999). His research has been published in Scientific Reports, Social Science & Medicine, Transcultural Psychiatry, andthe American Journal of Physical Anthropology. His dissertation research is supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Social Science Research Council, and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. Read and hear more about his work below! 


Op-ed: https://bhekisisa.org/article/2020-08-11-covid19-mental-health-south-africa-telemedicine-depression-anxiety-group/
TV interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02KicFbJp90
Radio interview: https://www.702.co.za/podcasts/196/the-best-of-afternoon-drive-with-joanne-joseph/349175/covid-19-has-changed-the-way-sas-only-toll-free-mental-health-helpline-works-heres-why-it-matters
Original research article: https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.13.20130120v1 (in press at Psychological Medicine)

Dr. Rilling’s research on fatherhood is featured in New York Times article

At a time when most parents have to balance work and parenting more than ever, Dr. Rilling’s research on fatherhood is highlighted in a New York Times article. Why Your Brain Short-Circuits When a Kid Cries summarizes the challenges of parents working from home while schools are not in session and explains the physical reactions to a child’s cries from a scientific perspective as well as the authors personal experience.

Dr. Justin Hosbey Co-edits Online Series on Black Ecologies

Dr. Justin Hosbey

The #BlackEcologies series is a digital humanities project that Dr. Hosbey is co-editing on the Black Perspectives blog, the online home of the African American Intellectual History Society. #BlackEcologies brings together research from scholars in the humanities and social sciences that critically address the enduring legacies of racism by exploring the ways that Black diaspora communities experience environmental catastrophe. This multimodal project will feature essays, photo-essays, digital storytelling projects, as well as short documentaries. Our goal is to explore how Afro-descendant people work to resist ecocide – intellectually, politically, and in practice. The introductory page to the series can be found here.

The Experimental Ethnography at Emory working group published a conversation on Mixtape Scholarship with Dr. Kwame M. Phillips (14PhD)

What does it mean to produce scholarship through sound? The Experimental Ethnography at Emory working group just published a conversation on Mixtape Scholarship with Dr. Kwame M. Phillips (Assistant Professor in the Department of Communications at John Cabot University in Rome, Italy; Emory Anthropology PhD 2014). Dr. Phillips and co-author Dr. Shana L. 

Redmond’s essay/mixtape “The People Who Keep on Going”: A Listening Party, Vol. I appears in The Futures of Black Radicalism, which is being promoted this Summer as a free e-book by publisher Verso Books. The playlist “is a people’s songbook, a soundtrack to the improvisational life and living of Blackness under the control of white supremacy. This is an effort to pull forward and give a name to what our bodies tell us with every needle drop, to hold tight that which combines individual voice and people’s rebellion . . . ” (Redmond & Phillips, 2017:207). Dr. Debra Vidali (Emory Anthropology; Faculty director for the Experimental Ethnography at Emory working group) took this as an opportunity to talk to Dr. Phillips about multimodal argumentation, ethnographic documentation, listening parties, and a playlist for the Futures of Black Radicalism. “The People Who Keep on Going” mixtape is hosted on Dr. Phillips’ TheDreadstarMovement site. Experimental Ethnography @ Emory

New Experimental Ethnography Undergraduate Blog Publications

Three experimental ethnography pieces by undergraduate students on COVID-19 experiences have been recently published on the Experimental Ethnography at Emory blog. These works were produced for ANT/THEA 377W “Fieldwork into Performance,” taught by Prof. Vidali in Spring 2019. 

“Rush Monologues” by Aditya Jhaveri is a verbatim ethnographic theater script based on interviews with three international students.

“Face-Time during COVID-19” by Katherine Pitts is a creative nonfiction essay aimed to promote awareness of isolation and the importance of staying connected in a highly disrupted world.

“Silent” by Joy Min is a short ethnographic theater piece documenting the experiences of people who are victims of racist/xenophobic sentiments concerning the origins of COVID-19.