Dr. Rilling interviewed by Dr. Oscar Duke for the BBC’s “The science of Dad”

Dr. Rilling interviewed by Dr. Oscar Duke for the BBC’s “The science of Dad”

In his interview with the BBC Dr. James Rilling presents his research on hormonal and neural changes men experience during fatherhood, including lower testosterone and higher oxytocin during early fatherhood.

The interviews with Dr. Rilling and other experts in the field covers the topic of fatherhood and its challenges broadly, listen to the full interview online.

Scott Schnur publishes blog post on the Society for Cultural Anthropology

Scott Schnur publishes blog post on the Society for Cultural Anthropology

Scott Schnur sits down with Dr. Elizabeth Emma Ferry (Brandeis University) to discuss how to creatively teach anthropological theory in graduate school. They discuss how course design can help students better engage with theory in order to reform the discipline and think creatively. Read the publication on the website of the Society for Cultural Anthropology.

 

Happy Anthropology Day!!

Happy Anthropology Day!!

The American Anthropological Association (AAA) designates the 3rd Thursday of February as Anthropology Day, a day to “celebrate what Anthropology is and what it can achieve” while “sharing it with the world around us.”  Emory Anthropology students stopped by today to share what they love about Anthropology, which included things like:

“It focuses on concepts I have always thought about but have never been able to articulate.  Anthro promotes understanding and acceptance for/of differences!”

“It allows me to apply cultural competence to the social justice issues that I am passionate about.”

“I love anthro because it opens my mind into thinking in new ways and broadens my world view!”

“It connects us to our ROOTS!”

“Because it’s teaching me how to be a more empathetic doctor and human.”

“It provides multi-dimensional perspectives that apply to many disciplines.”

“Anthropology has taught be how to be in the world in a meaningful way.”

We love to see how studying anthropology allows our students to feel more connected to each other and the world, while focusing on a broad range of interests and applications.  Whatever our specific goals and inspirations, we all believe in the power of anthropology to help make the world a better place!  #AnthroDay

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Emory Anthropology Department professor Carol Worthman on spearheading the neuroscience track of the ETSI

Emory Anthropology Department professor Carol Worthman on spearheading the neuroscience track of the ETSI

Since 2007, Emory University has partnered in the Emory-Tibet Science Initiative (ETSI) with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Buddhist community, to realize their vision to incorporate science into the monastic curriculum. Emory Anthropology Department professor Carol Worthman has spearheaded the neuroscience track from its inception, orchestrating a 6-year curricular development and pilot phase, and then implementing it at the 3 biggest monastic universities in south India. “In December, 2019, we celebrated the successful roll-out of the entire 6-year ETSI curriculum in the monasteries at a gathering with His Holiness, the monastic community, and ETSI leaders in Mundgod, India. We also graduated the first cohort of monastics to complete the 6-year program. These were historic undertakings for the monastic community, and especially for monastic students and the many senior monastics who work to realize the goal of monastic science education and already are productively exploring fresh ideas and insights from these distinctive perspectives.” (Carol Worthman)

The events not only celebrated ETSI milestones, but also inaugurated a new debating hall at one of the big monasteries and, most importantly, marked a 600th anniversary of Je Tsongkhapa, founder of a major school of Tibetan Buddhism to which His Holiness belongs. Photos show the interior of the vast new debate hall, celebration of graduating classes, and presentations by Worthman of reflections and the neuroscience books ETSI has produced. Also included is a view of Drepung Loseling prayer hall (the Dalai Lama’s home monastery), where ETSI were held for the first 3 years until a large science center was built. The photo of illuminations at Drepung honoring the anniversary show that monastics really know how to celebrate!

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