Klamath Henry (19C) Produces Website On The Resiliency of the Three Sisters Crop

Klamath Henry (19C) Produces Website On The Resiliency of the Three Sisters Crop

Klamath Henry, a junior anthropology major (B.A.), published a website in the fall of 2017 on her ANT497R research, advised by Dr. Debra Vidali. This research looks at the resiliency of the Iroquois Three Sisters food system and its impact on the Tuscarora Indian community. The website showcased findings in her research, and includes self produced poetry, photography, resources, quotations and a short video.

“The resiliency of North American Indigenous food groups through forced assimilation and colonization is incredible. I was fortunate enough to have had the opportunity to take research credit to investigate my tribe’s traditional ways of producing food, and produce a website to showcase my findings for both my tribal community and the greater public. It is important that universities take the time to decolonize their ways of thinking about research, because in doing so, they allow for the erased voices of Indigenous peoples to be heard,” says Henry.

“Naming the Forty-Seven.” Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) puts names and faces to anonymous migrants drowning at sea

“Naming the Forty-Seven.” Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) puts names and faces to anonymous migrants drowning at sea

“What if we started reporting tragedies in the Mediterranean like we do any others – with names and not numbers? There were forty-seven humans lost in a single shipwreck. This isn’t the story of their shipwreck. It’s the story of them,” says Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) .

Dr. Alexander writes about her work to identify the migrants who died when their boat capsized on February 4th while trying to reach Europe. She has become an expert on the migrant crisis through the research for her documentary The Burning: An Untold Story from the Other Side of the Migrant Crisis.

Happy Anthropology Day!

Happy Anthropology Day!

Happy #AnthroDay!  Emory undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty gathered this afternoon to enjoy donuts and enlightening conversation with our fellow Anthropologists.  We had a great turnout, and a number of students contributed to our board by completing the sentence “I [heart] to study Anthropology because…”  Whatever the different reasons that inspire us, we all share a love for Anthropology!

Andrea Rissing explores the ethnographically generative practice of “flipping the field” in Anthropology News

Andrea Rissing explores the ethnographically generative practice of “flipping the field” in Anthropology News

Graduate student Andrea Rissing publishes article in Anthropology News describing the approach to her research on Iowa farms, which includes letting the farmers contribute questions they feel are worth asking.

“I always found that farmers had insightful opinions on what questions merited investigation. People know what is important in their own lives, and creating space for them to flip the interview made for more interesting, dynamic research.”

Isabella Alexander’s (16PhD) class is featured on Emory News

In Anthropology 385: The Migrant and Refugee Crisis Isabella Alexander combines classroom learning with creation of real-life solutions. Students interacted with people affected by the migrant crisis and created final projects that are aimed at having genuine impact, such as a mentoring program for young refugees.

“To the students, it was a heady experience, steeped in the thrill of identifying a problem and actually doing something about it. For their professor, it was an affirming case study in the power of engaged learning.” Emory News Center

 

Grace Veatch is interviewed by Sapiens

“What do giant rats and tiny ‘Hobbits’ have in common? They both lived on a tiny island in Indonesia and form an important piece of the puzzle for uncovering what it means to be human.”

Homo floresiensis rat bones - Veatch examines a “hobbit,” or Homo floresiensis, skull from Liang Bua Cave.

This is the focus of Grace Veatch’s dissertation research, as she analyzes thousands of tiny and giant sized rat bones that were recovered in a cave site along with a human ancestor named Homo floresiensis.

“I hope to understand how these ‘Hobbit’s’ incorporated small mammals into their diet, and how this might compare to how modern humans also use this vital resource on an island depauperate of large game. Check out my research showcased in an online article through Sapiens.org for more information about this exciting research happening here in the Anthropology Department at Emory University.”

 

 

Aubrey Graham (PhD 2016) is featured in The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative

Aubrey Graham (PhD 2016) is featured in The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative

Aubrey P. Graham’s (PhD 2016) photographic exhibition created in coordination with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative will hang in the Harvard Asia Center from Nov. 2- 30, 2017. “High Ground: Disaster, Risk, and Resilience in the Philippines” explores the social dynamics that affect disaster preparedness across two distinctive communities: Sitio Kislap and Gawad Kalinga.

High Ground: Disaster Risk and Resilience in the Philippines Photo Exhibition

Q&A with Dr. Aubrey Graham, Photographer of “Disaster, Risk, and Resilience in the Philippines” Exhibit

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