Faculty Search in Anthropology – Assistant Professor

EMORY UNIVERSITY

Assistant Professor, Tenure-Track

Location: Georgia

Salary: Open

Type: Full Time – Entry

Required Education: Doctorate

The Department of Anthropology and the Institute for Quantitative Theory and Methods at Emory University invite applications for a joint tenure-track assistant professor position, with tenure home in Anthropology. We seek a scholar with an active anthropological research program addressing core issues in biological and/or cultural evolution, using the tools of computational biology with application to empirical datasets. Candidates must have a doctoral degree, an excellent research record, and a demonstrated commitment to teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Qualified candidates will be able to teach advanced statistics courses and introductory courses in Anthropology. Ability to interact effectively with faculty in two broadly inclusive departments is important.

Applications should include a curriculum vita, a research statement, a teaching statement, and complete contact information for three references. The Department of Anthropology, Emory College and Emory University embrace diversity and seek candidates who will participate in a climate that attracts students of all ethnicities, races, nationalities, and genders. In a separate statement, please reflect upon your experience and vision regarding the teaching and mentorship of students from diverse backgrounds.

Applications will be accepted through November 9, 2018. To apply for this position, please visit apply.interfolio.com/53932  and submit your materials free of charge through Interfolio.

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

 

Jessica Thompson co-authors article in “Trends in Ecology and Evolution”

While it has long been believed that humans evolved from one population in Africa, genetic evidence is pointing towards several interlinked groups in Africa instead. Dr. Jessica Thompson collaborated in an article for the Journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution along with 22 other authors. eScienceCommons interviewed Dr. Thompson about her research.

Science Seen visited Dietrich Stout’s lab

“Science Seen” is dedicated to showcasing science at Emory and giving a behind-the-scenes look at how science and research is done. Science Seen visited Dietrich Stout’s lab to learn more about how researchers there are recreating the past to better understand the human mind. Watch the Video on Facebook and learn more about Science Seen on Instagram.

John Lindo’s research featured in Emory News

John Lindo’s research featured in Emory News

John Lindo’s publication in The American Journal of Human Genetics is featured in Emory News. Dr. Lindo specializes in the molecular and computational aspects of Ancient DNA research. He presents his work on the Native American Tsimshian tribe and their population changes based on DNA research.

“I want to help Native American tribes to reclaim knowledge of their very ancient evolutionary histories — histories that have been largely wiped away because of colonialism,” says Emory geneticist John Lindo in the Emory News article.

Photo by Kay Hinton, Emory Photo/Video.

Six Anthropology Seniors Complete Honors Theses

At our Honors and Awards Luncheon on Friday, April 27, the Anthropology department recognized six Anthropology undergraduate students who successfully defended honors theses this year. These students are scheduled to graduate with honors on May 14. Please join us in congratulating these students on their hard work and accomplishment!

Honors Awards Luncheon 2018 - honors.jpg
Left to right: Amelia Howell, Soukaina Akdim, Rashika Verma, Gordon Hong, Rebecca Lebeaux, Sharon Hsieh, Dr. Kristin Phillips (honors program coordinator)

2018 Honors Students

Soukaina Akdim – Tattooed Bodies: Embodying and Expressing Identity
Advised by Liv Nilsson Stutz

Gordon Hong – From the Horn of Africa to Clarkston, Georgia: Subjective Well-Being of East African Immigrants and Refugees
Advised by Peter Little

Amelia Howell – Booty Hop and the Snake: Race, Gender, and Identity in an Atlanta Strip Club
Advised by Liv Nilsson Stutz

Sharon Hsieh – Treatment Adherence Patterns in Rural Georgian Veterans with Sleep Apnea: An Anthropological Approach
Advised by Carol Worthman

Rebecca Lebeaux – 100 Years Later: Modeling Why a Modern-Day Influenza Pandemic Would Still Disproportionately Affect Low and Middle-Income Countries
Advised by Craig Hadley

Rashika Verma – Just What the Doctor Ordered? Exploring Doctors’ Perspectives on Food Insecurity and Health Outcomes in an Urban Georgia Food Desert
Advised by Mel Konner

 

A list of all previously completed Anthropology honors theses is available at http://anthropology.emory.edu/home/undergraduate/opportunities/honors.html.

 

 

ANT 385: Anthropology & Performance culminates in Ethnographic Theater Showcase

ANT 385: Anthropology & Performance culminates in Ethnographic Theater Showcase

What does the research-to-stage process look like?  And why does it matter?  Last week the students in Prof. Debra Vidali’s “Anthropology & Performance” class presented a dynamic showcase of ethnographic theater projects, based on original research.   Students transformed over 100 hours of research interviews and extensive participant-observation research into verbatim documentary theater performances that examined issues of well-being, diversity, belonging, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and birth control.  The vivid portrayals brought to light issues and voices that are less well understood and represented, and sparked a lively audience discussion about future applications and interventions.

ShowcaseCollage

Andrea Rissing explores the ethnographically generative practice of “flipping the field” in Anthropology News

Andrea Rissing explores the ethnographically generative practice of “flipping the field” in Anthropology News

Graduate student Andrea Rissing publishes article in Anthropology News describing the approach to her research on Iowa farms, which includes letting the farmers contribute questions they feel are worth asking.

“I always found that farmers had insightful opinions on what questions merited investigation. People know what is important in their own lives, and creating space for them to flip the interview made for more interesting, dynamic research.”