Gabriela Sheets (PhD, 2017) receives the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Dissertation Award for her 2017 dissertation on “The Developmental Ecology of the Infant Gut Microbiome”.

Gabriela Sheets (PhD, 2017) receives the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Dissertation Award for her 2017 dissertation on “The Developmental Ecology of the Infant Gut Microbiome”.

Gabriela Sheets receives the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Dissertation Award for her 2017 dissertation on “The Developmental Ecology of the Infant Microbiome”.

The Committee describes Sheets’ work as “novel meshing of anthropology and biology to explore an emerging area of general interest,” and thought it was likely to “make important contributions well beyond the medical anthropology community.”  One member called it an “exemplar in where science should go.”

“Recognition begs reflection, and reflection begs gratitude. The beast that this dissertation was to become invited me on a marvelous journey through the lives, stories and biologies of many Salvadoran families, for which I am forever grateful. Before my observing eye, life spilled out. She sometimes clumsily, but always excitedly, tripped over herself to whisper her secrets and to weave her tales through the human body. Even under and around the long shadows of death where meaning was mute, her whispers sounded. Thank you Emory for the opportunity to research questions that excite me, always supported by frameworks rooted in our anthropological and biological heritage. I hope to make even a small difference with the tools and drive that you provided for me.” Gabriela Sheets

Alexa Dietrich (PhD, 2007) publishes article on Puerto Rico

Dietrich and her co-authors, Adriana María Garriga-López and Claudia Sofía Garriga-López, point out in the article that the state Puerto Rico is currenlty in after the recent hurricanes cannot be seen without taking into account the history of this US territory. They cite mismanagement such as “extractivism, monoculture, and poor waste management”, as well as the so called Jones Act as unnatural disaster that strike the island.

The authors offer a vision for the future: “What vulnerable communities need is an infrastructure of sustainable economic development and reliable everyday public services so their existing adaptive capacities can be strengthened and supported.”

Dietrich wrote her dissertation on “The Corporation Next Door: Pharmaceutical Companies in Community, Health and the Environment in Puerto Rico”.

Dr. Chio’s film “Peasant Family Happiness” is recognized at International Heritage Film Festival

Dr. Jenny Chio’s film “Peasant Family Happiness” was recognized with an honorable mention at Heritales: International Heritage Film Festival, which was held last weekend in Évora, Portugal. There will be a screening and a public talk on October 8th in Santa Fe, as part of the Museum of International Folk Art’s current exhibition “Quilts of Southwest China”. Additionally, Dr. Chio will be giving a closed seminar for museum docents to help expand their knowledge and familiarity with social and political conditions in ethnic minority regions of Southwest China.

Dr. Jessica Thompson’s work featured in New York Times

Jess_thompson_rock_art_P7091147.JPG

Finding ancient human remains in Africa is rare and most of the work done in this field is recent. A lot has happened in the last few years however. Emory’s eScienceCommons detailed Dr. Thompson’s role in the research.

Dr. Jessica Thompson hopes to learn more about migration patterns from the DNA of bones discovered in Malawi. It shows that the hunter gatherers that lived there as recently as 2,000 years ago are not genetically related to today’s population. Scientists previously relied on tools left behind to create migrations patterns. DNA now gives answers to whether populations mixed or whether one was forced out. The oldest samples from Malawi are over 8,000 years old. Dr. Thompson had help from graduate student Kendra Sirak with dating and DNA extraction of the 8,100 year old skeleton.

The work that Dr. Thompson collaborated in was featured in the New York Times.

thompson_sirak_0061602-17AB-F016_1.jpg

Isabella Alexander (2016, PhD) publishes article on migrant crisis

African asylum seekers - Alphonse Ngiaba shows the author official papers stating that his application for asylum was still under consideration in Spain. Despite these documents, he had been picked up and deported.
Alexander with Alphonse Ngiaba, Morocco.

Dr. Isabella Alexander, anthropologist and filmmaker, published an article on the Wenner-Gren Foundation website Sapiens. She describes some of her experiences during her research on the migrant crisis. She has traveled extensively while working on her documentary The Burning: An Untold Story from the Other Side of the Migrant Crisis.

African asylum seekers - Sprawling, makeshift camps in the mountains of northern Morocco are home to large numbers of sub-Saharan Africans who await their chance to cross into Spain.
Makeshift camps in the mountains of Morocco.

Dr. Chio’s film selected for the 2017 Heritales Film Festival

Chio_Blog.jpgDr. Jenny Chio’s film, 农家乐 Peasant Family Happiness, is selected for the 2017 Heritales: International Heritage Film Festival in September 2017 in Évora, Portugal. Co-organized by UNESCO and the University of Évora, the festival’s theme this year is “sustainable communities,” and it is one of the few film festivals focused on exploring cultural heritage politics through documentary film.

 

Riche Barnes (PhD, 2009) is named dean of Yale’s Pierson College

Barnes is currently the assistant dean of social sciences and a professor of sociocultural anthropology at Endicott College. She wrote her dissertation on “Still Uplifting the Race: Black Professional Wives and the Career and Family Debate.” Her most recent book “Raising the Race: Black Career Women Redefine Marriage, Motherhood and Community” won the 2017 Race, Gender, and Class Section Book Award from the American Sociological Association.