Jessica Thompson co-authors article in “Trends in Ecology and Evolution”

While it has long been believed that humans evolved from one population in Africa, genetic evidence is pointing towards several interlinked groups in Africa instead. Dr. Jessica Thompson collaborated in an article for the Journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution along with 22 other authors. eScienceCommons interviewed Dr. Thompson about her research.

ANT 385: Anthropology & Performance culminates in Ethnographic Theater Showcase

ANT 385: Anthropology & Performance culminates in Ethnographic Theater Showcase

What does the research-to-stage process look like?  And why does it matter?  Last week the students in Prof. Debra Vidali’s “Anthropology & Performance” class presented a dynamic showcase of ethnographic theater projects, based on original research.   Students transformed over 100 hours of research interviews and extensive participant-observation research into verbatim documentary theater performances that examined issues of well-being, diversity, belonging, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and birth control.  The vivid portrayals brought to light issues and voices that are less well understood and represented, and sparked a lively audience discussion about future applications and interventions.

ShowcaseCollage

Klamath Henry (19C) Produces Website On The Resiliency of the Three Sisters Crop

Klamath Henry (19C) Produces Website On The Resiliency of the Three Sisters Crop

Klamath Henry, a junior anthropology major (B.A.), published a website in the fall of 2017 on her ANT497R research, advised by Dr. Debra Vidali. This research looks at the resiliency of the Iroquois Three Sisters food system and its impact on the Tuscarora Indian community. The website showcased findings in her research, and includes self produced poetry, photography, resources, quotations and a short video.

“The resiliency of North American Indigenous food groups through forced assimilation and colonization is incredible. I was fortunate enough to have had the opportunity to take research credit to investigate my tribe’s traditional ways of producing food, and produce a website to showcase my findings for both my tribal community and the greater public. It is important that universities take the time to decolonize their ways of thinking about research, because in doing so, they allow for the erased voices of Indigenous peoples to be heard,” says Henry.

“Naming the Forty-Seven.” Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) puts names and faces to anonymous migrants drowning at sea

“Naming the Forty-Seven.” Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) puts names and faces to anonymous migrants drowning at sea

“What if we started reporting tragedies in the Mediterranean like we do any others – with names and not numbers? There were forty-seven humans lost in a single shipwreck. This isn’t the story of their shipwreck. It’s the story of them,” says Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) .

Dr. Alexander writes about her work to identify the migrants who died when their boat capsized on February 4th while trying to reach Europe. She has become an expert on the migrant crisis through the research for her documentary The Burning: An Untold Story from the Other Side of the Migrant Crisis.

Happy Anthropology Day!

Happy Anthropology Day!

Happy #AnthroDay!  Emory undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty gathered this afternoon to enjoy donuts and enlightening conversation with our fellow Anthropologists.  We had a great turnout, and a number of students contributed to our board by completing the sentence “I [heart] to study Anthropology because…”  Whatever the different reasons that inspire us, we all share a love for Anthropology!

Alexa Dietrich (PhD, 2007) publishes article on Puerto Rico

Dietrich and her co-authors, Adriana María Garriga-López and Claudia Sofía Garriga-López, point out in the article that the state Puerto Rico is currenlty in after the recent hurricanes cannot be seen without taking into account the history of this US territory. They cite mismanagement such as “extractivism, monoculture, and poor waste management”, as well as the so called Jones Act as unnatural disaster that strike the island.

The authors offer a vision for the future: “What vulnerable communities need is an infrastructure of sustainable economic development and reliable everyday public services so their existing adaptive capacities can be strengthened and supported.”

Dietrich wrote her dissertation on “The Corporation Next Door: Pharmaceutical Companies in Community, Health and the Environment in Puerto Rico”.