Anthropology Celebrates Record Number of Honors Graduates

 

Honors 2019
Left to right: Sierra Stubbs, Abbe McCarter, Sarah Elmongy, Aditi Majoe, Dr. Kristin Phillips, Anna Glass, Karina Collins, Kristen Kaufman, Lila Bilsky. Not pictured: Katya Bobrek, Neharika Penmetcha.

The Anthropology department is proud to recognize a record number of honors graduates for 2019!  This year, ten Anthropology students successfully defended honors theses, the culmination of a year (or more!) of independent research and writing. Their projects were completed under the supervision of faculty advisors and committee members from within and outside of Anthropology, with support from faculty honors coordinator Dr. Kristin Phillips.  Topics ranged from art forgery to opioid use disorder to genomic analysis, representing the wide variety of applications for anthropological study. These students were honored at the Anthropology Honors and Awards Luncheon on April 26th, and graduated with honors at ceremonies on May 12 and 13.

Please see below for a full list of theses, and join us in congratulating these students on their hard work and accomplishment!

Lila Bilsky – Parental Perceptions and Preferences of Asthma Medication Delivery Devices in a Pediatric Emergency Room
Advised by Carol Worthman and Peter Brown

Katya Bobrek – Genomic Analysis and Natural Selection Scan of Mexican Mayan and Indigenous Populations
Advised by John Lindo

Karina Collins – Community Stigma and Opioid Use Disorder in Southern West Virginia
Advised by Karen Hegtvedt (Sociology)

Sarah Elmongy – Western Perceptions of Arab Women & Their Lived Identities as Women
Advised by Craig Hadley

Anna Glass – The Price of Forgery: An Anthropological Perspective on the Value of Fine Art
Advised by Bobby Paul

Kristen Kaufman – Sustainability, Being, and Reconciliation: Decolonizing Nature and the Australian Imaginary
Advised by Alice Reznickova (Ripon College, WI) and Kristin Phillips

Aditi Majoe – Behavior, Learning, and Lithics: Understanding the Process of Learning and Handaxe Production through Behavior
Advised by Dietrich Stout

Abbe McCarter – Windows into the Lived Experiences and Health Consequences of Food Insecurity on the Cattaraugus Reservation: Implications for Indigenous Peoples’ Food Sovereignty
Advised by Debra Vidali

Neharika Penmetcha – Zooarchaeological Faunal Identifiability: Using GIS Technology to Facilitate Analysis of Gracile Long Bone Specimens
Advised by Jess Thompson (Yale) and John Lindo

Sierra Stubbs – Do Food and Drinks Have Gender?: Cultural Conceptions of Food Types among Emory Undergraduates
Advised by Peter Brown

A list of all previously completed Anthropology honors theses is available on our website.

Douglas Falen (92C) publishes new book on African Science

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Douglas Falen (C’92) is a cultural anthropologist at nearby Agnes Scott College in Decatur. His new ethnography, African Science: Witchcraft, Vodun, and Healing in Southern Benin (University of Wisconsin Press) examines the ways that Benin’s occult world blends notions of magic, science, and religion. In emphasizing the moral ambivalence of human acts, Beninois people compare African witchcraft to western technology, known as “white people’s witchcraft.” The books explains how “witchcraft”  becomes a universal, all-encompassing term that allows Beninois people to incorporate foreign religions and esoteric traditions, including Hindu mysticism and Freemasonry, into a single category.Falen.AfricanScience.c.jpg

Dr. Justin Pargeter publishes research on prehistoric toolmaking

Dr. Justin Pargeter publishes research on prehistoric toolmaking

In a recent publication in the journal AntiquityJustin Pargeter (a Postdoctoral researcher with Emory University’s Anthropology Department) argues the motivations of prehistoric hunter-gatherers for selecting particular rocks for toolmaking are often explained in too rigidly functional or symbolic terms. By examining the exploitation of crystal quartz at two archaeological sites (Ntloana Tšoana and Sehonghong) in Lesotho, southern Africa, he and his co-author Jamie Hampson (University of Exeter) reveal that stone tool production required a form of engagement unique to crystal quartz’s specific properties (including possibly quartz crystal’s piezoelectric effects). The prefered use of quartz crystals—irrespective of the availability of other rocks for tool production—demonstrates agency and variability in the prehistoric technologies.

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Calling all knappers – Dr. Stout studies the connection between ancient stone tool-making and the human brain

Calling all knappers – Dr. Stout studies the connection between ancient stone tool-making and the human brain

Dr. Dietrich Stout is an experimental archeologist at the department of Anthropology where he researches connections between prehistoric stone tool-making, known as knapping, and the human brain. He has set up an online experiment in collaboration with Robert Rein at the German Sport University Cologne. Participants are asked to spend 10 minutes of their time to help deepen our understanding of the relationship between the visual-spatial skills used in knapping and areas of the brain that are involved in language processing. Dr. Stout is hoping to establish whether participants can differentiate size the of stone flakes removed during knapping, and how novice knappers fare in comparison to experts.

Read more about this on eScienceCommons and Dr. Stout’s website.

 

 

Peter Little’s research is spotlighted in the Chronicle

Dr. Little participated in the Happiness and Well-being Project based at Saint Luis University along with over 150 other researchers from 20 nation and spanning multiple fields. The Chronicle Article spotlighted the work done by Dr. Little in collaboration with Workneh Negatu (Agricultural Economics, Addis Ababa University) and Mark Risjord (Philosophy, Emory University), which focused on life satisfaction and well-being in northern Kenya and Ethiopia.

 

 

 

John Lindo’s research is features in the New York Times and Emory Science News Center

John Lindo’s research is features in the New York Times and Emory Science News Center

DNA analyses show that ancient populations of the Peruvian highlands adapted to the introduction of agriculture and an extreme, high-altitude environment in ways distinct from other global populations. (Emory New Center)

The New York Times published an article about the deductions made by recent DNA research about migrations to and within the Americas, to which Dr. Lindo’s research in the Andes contributed.