Scott Schnur publishes blog post on the Society for Cultural Anthropology

Scott Schnur publishes blog post on the Society for Cultural Anthropology

Scott Schnur sits down with Dr. Elizabeth Emma Ferry (Brandeis University) to discuss how to creatively teach anthropological theory in graduate school. They discuss how course design can help students better engage with theory in order to reform the discipline and think creatively. Read the publication on the website of the Society for Cultural Anthropology.

 

Paul Dallaghan is interviewed on CNN for International Day of Yoga

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Paul Dallaghan is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology. His research project entitled “Breath, stress, and health: a biocultural study of hatha yoga” involves a controlled multicultural subject intervention, registered with clinicaltrials.gov, to assess the effects of engaged practice with breath focus on markers of stress, aging, and mental wellbeing. Paul will teach The Anthropology of Yoga this fall semester at Emory.

You can watch the Interview on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Atlanta Science Festival – Emory Department of Anthropology brings Archaeology to children

ATLScienceFestOn March 21st at the Brownwood Park Pavilion, the Department of Anthropology brought archaeology out of the university and into the community as part of the annual Atlanta Science Festival. In “Become an Archaeologist,” children and parents learned about archaeological science, including how to extract DNA, perform chemical residue analysis, and put together artifacts and bones.

Grace Veatch continues her research in Liang Bua, Indonesia and is features on National Geographic

Veatch-bio.jpgVeatch, a graduate student who researches the environmental context of the Late Pleistocene archaeological site Liang Bua in Indonesia, specifically focuses on the rodent remains found in the cave. She remarks on their diversity as a group of mammals helped by the continuity of bones in the cave sequence, which persist over the 190,000-year stretch preserved in the cave. 

Read more about the work of Veatch and other researchers in the National Geographic article.

 

Erik Ringen is awarded H. Russel Bernard Graduate Student Paper Prize

Erik Ringen is awarded H. Russel Bernard Graduate Student Paper Prize

At the 2018 American Anthropological Association meeting, graduate student Erik Ringen won the Society for Anthropological Science’s ‘H. Russel Bernard Graduate Student Paper Prize’ for his paper (co-authored with Pavel Duda and Adrian Jaegi) “Daily food sharing in non-industrial societies: effects of subsistence, socioecology, and phylogeny”. Congratulations!

Photo, left to right: Erik Ringen, Stephen Chrisomalis and H. Russell Bernard

Shreyas Sreenath reflects on his fieldwork in a piece titled “Sharing, tasting, and wasting food in our mother tongue”

Shreyas Sreenath reflects on his fieldwork in a piece titled “Sharing, tasting, and wasting food in our mother tongue”

His contribution published on the Culture and Agriculture section of the American Anthropological Association explores the role our mother tongues play in wasting and sharing food. It reflects on morning municipal sweeping routes and daily garbage hauls in Bangalore, India, occasions when residents interact with sanitation workers by discarding food and sharing leftovers.

“How do our tongues–organs of speech and taste–weave charity into promiscuous expenditure? How might they archive the embodiment and routinization of power?”

Shreyas Sreenath is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology.