Douglas Falen (92C) publishes new book on African Science

Falen headshot.jpg
Douglas Falen (C’92) is a cultural anthropologist at nearby Agnes Scott College in Decatur. His new ethnography, African Science: Witchcraft, Vodun, and Healing in Southern Benin (University of Wisconsin Press) examines the ways that Benin’s occult world blends notions of magic, science, and religion. In emphasizing the moral ambivalence of human acts, Beninois people compare African witchcraft to western technology, known as “white people’s witchcraft.” The books explains how “witchcraft”  becomes a universal, all-encompassing term that allows Beninois people to incorporate foreign religions and esoteric traditions, including Hindu mysticism and Freemasonry, into a single category.Falen.AfricanScience.c.jpg

Kwame Phillips (14PhD) and Debra Vidali present ethnographic work at the British Museum in London

Kwame Phillips (14PhD) and Debra Vidali present ethnographic work at the British Museum in London

Kwame Phillips (14PhD and faculty member at John Cabot University in Rome, Italy) and Emory Department of Anthropology Professor Debra Vidali are presenting and installing experimental ethnographic work at the British Museum in London on June 2. Their project “Kabusha Radio Remix,” is an ethnographic sound installation that turns the tables on colonial soft power and creates a tribute to the late David Yumba, wise man of the Zambian airwaves. The installation re-purposes archived audio recordings from Yumba’s popular Radio Zambia program, Kabusha Takolelwe Bowa (a Bemba proverb meaning “The Person Who Inquires First, Is Not Poisoned by a Mushroom” or “The One Who Asks Questions, Never Goes Wrong”). Learn more about the remix project on the Bemba Online Project. Phillips and Vidali’s presentation Collisions of Memory, Voice, Sound, and Physicality though a Multi-sensorial Radio Remix Installation will be at the Art, Materiality and Representation conference, hosted by The Royal Anthropological Institute, The British Museum, and University of London SOAS.

“Naming the Forty-Seven.” Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) puts names and faces to anonymous migrants drowning at sea

“Naming the Forty-Seven.” Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) puts names and faces to anonymous migrants drowning at sea

“What if we started reporting tragedies in the Mediterranean like we do any others – with names and not numbers? There were forty-seven humans lost in a single shipwreck. This isn’t the story of their shipwreck. It’s the story of them,” says Isabella Alexander (PhD 2016) .

Dr. Alexander writes about her work to identify the migrants who died when their boat capsized on February 4th while trying to reach Europe. She has become an expert on the migrant crisis through the research for her documentary The Burning: An Untold Story from the Other Side of the Migrant Crisis.

Isabella Alexander’s (16PhD) class is featured on Emory News

In Anthropology 385: The Migrant and Refugee Crisis Isabella Alexander combines classroom learning with creation of real-life solutions. Students interacted with people affected by the migrant crisis and created final projects that are aimed at having genuine impact, such as a mentoring program for young refugees.

“To the students, it was a heady experience, steeped in the thrill of identifying a problem and actually doing something about it. For their professor, it was an affirming case study in the power of engaged learning.” Emory News Center

 

Aubrey Graham (PhD 2016) is featured in The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative

Aubrey Graham (PhD 2016) is featured in The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative

Aubrey P. Graham’s (PhD 2016) photographic exhibition created in coordination with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative will hang in the Harvard Asia Center from Nov. 2- 30, 2017. “High Ground: Disaster, Risk, and Resilience in the Philippines” explores the social dynamics that affect disaster preparedness across two distinctive communities: Sitio Kislap and Gawad Kalinga.

High Ground: Disaster Risk and Resilience in the Philippines Photo Exhibition

Q&A with Dr. Aubrey Graham, Photographer of “Disaster, Risk, and Resilience in the Philippines” Exhibit

APGRAHAM GK Small Leticia HHI

Gabriela Sheets (PhD, 2017) receives the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Dissertation Award for her 2017 dissertation on “The Developmental Ecology of the Infant Gut Microbiome”.

Gabriela Sheets (PhD, 2017) receives the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Dissertation Award for her 2017 dissertation on “The Developmental Ecology of the Infant Gut Microbiome”.

Gabriela Sheets receives the Society for Medical Anthropology’s Dissertation Award for her 2017 dissertation on “The Developmental Ecology of the Infant Microbiome”.

The Committee describes Sheets’ work as “novel meshing of anthropology and biology to explore an emerging area of general interest,” and thought it was likely to “make important contributions well beyond the medical anthropology community.”  One member called it an “exemplar in where science should go.”

“Recognition begs reflection, and reflection begs gratitude. The beast that this dissertation was to become invited me on a marvelous journey through the lives, stories and biologies of many Salvadoran families, for which I am forever grateful. Before my observing eye, life spilled out. She sometimes clumsily, but always excitedly, tripped over herself to whisper her secrets and to weave her tales through the human body. Even under and around the long shadows of death where meaning was mute, her whispers sounded. Thank you Emory for the opportunity to research questions that excite me, always supported by frameworks rooted in our anthropological and biological heritage. I hope to make even a small difference with the tools and drive that you provided for me.” Gabriela Sheets