Isabella Alexander (2016, PhD) publishes article on migrant crisis

African asylum seekers - Alphonse Ngiaba shows the author official papers stating that his application for asylum was still under consideration in Spain. Despite these documents, he had been picked up and deported.
Alexander with Alphonse Ngiaba, Morocco.

Dr. Isabella Alexander, anthropologist and filmmaker, published an article on the Wenner-Gren Foundation website Sapiens. She describes some of her experiences during her research on the migrant crisis. She has traveled extensively while working on her documentary The Burning: An Untold Story from the Other Side of the Migrant Crisis.

African asylum seekers - Sprawling, makeshift camps in the mountains of northern Morocco are home to large numbers of sub-Saharan Africans who await their chance to cross into Spain.
Makeshift camps in the mountains of Morocco.

Dr. Chio’s film selected for the 2017 Heritales Film Festival

Chio_Blog.jpgDr. Jenny Chio’s film, 农家乐 Peasant Family Happiness, is selected for the 2017 Heritales: International Heritage Film Festival in September 2017 in Évora, Portugal. Co-organized by UNESCO and the University of Évora, the festival’s theme this year is “sustainable communities,” and it is one of the few film festivals focused on exploring cultural heritage politics through documentary film.


Riche Barnes (PhD, 2009) is named dean of Yale’s Pierson College

Barnes is currently the assistant dean of social sciences and a professor of sociocultural anthropology at Endicott College. She wrote her dissertation on “Still Uplifting the Race: Black Professional Wives and the Career and Family Debate.” Her most recent book “Raising the Race: Black Career Women Redefine Marriage, Motherhood and Community” won the 2017 Race, Gender, and Class Section Book Award from the American Sociological Association.



Welcome to the 2017 Graduate Cohort!

The Anthropology Department at Emory welcomes four new graduate students to the program this Fall. They come from diverse educational backgrounds and have exciting research that they will pursue in the coming years.

Composite 2017 photo

Bridget Hansen earned bachelor’s degrees in Anthropology and Classical Studies at the University of Illinois in Chicago. Her research focuses on how cultural beliefs and practices of mental illness and health interact with the neoliberalism of Euro-American systems of biomedicine and psychology in the Arabian Gulf countries. She has conducted research in Oman and other Gulf countries with a Fulbright Fellowship and has been awarded the Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation for her work at Emory. She was recently featured in Emory News as an entering graduate student with exciting research and great accomplishments.

AJ Jones earned the Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from Princeton University. Her research interests include the topics of illness, disability, medicine, gender, and the body. Prior to coming to Emory, she researched the subjectivity and narratives of girls and women with Turner Syndrome, a genetic condition in which females are born with a partially or entirely missing X chromosome, rendering them infertile, among other physical effects. She hopes to continue and build upon this line of research at Emory.

Jordan Martin earned bachelor’s degrees in Biology and Psychology at Miami University. His research focuses on the proximate and ultimate bases of social behavior and relationships in human and non-human primates, particularly with the evolution and biological underpinnings of social personality traits, the evolutionary consequences of cooperative breeding, and the determinants and functional significance of affiliative and and attachment bonds. Prior to arriving at Emory, he spent a year conducting research in Vienna, and he is a Woodruff Scholar in the Laney Graduate School.

Erik Ringen earned the Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from Washington State University. He is interested in comparative and quantitative approaches to understanding human behavior and health from an evolutionary perspective. While at Emory, he will focus on ingestive behavior and the natural history of human interactions with plant secondary compounds in food, medicine, and drug use. Prior to coming to Emory, he worked as a researcher with the Human Relations Area Files project at Yale University.